1974 JENSEN INTERCEPTOR III CONVERTIBLE
H&H Classics | 12-Oct-2016 | Imperial War Museum Duxford | Venue : Duxford Cambridgeshire CB22 4QR
Category : Classic Cars
Lot No. : 20
Year : 1974
Engine Size : 7212cc
Colour : Blue
Interior : Black
Registration No. : MBW636N
Chassis No. : 2311-1666
Engine No. : # 00286
No longer available - Sold or withdrawn from sale
 

 

Jensen's striking replacement for the slant-eyed C-V8 first saw the light of day in 1966. It broke some of the firm's established traditions in that the design was outsourced - to Carrozzeria Touring - and the bodies were made of steel rather than glass reinforced plastic. Power was initially supplied by a 6276cc Chrysler V8, driving through either a four-speed manual or three-speed TorqueFlite automatic transmission to an LSD-equipped Salisbury rear axle. The MKII model of 1969 brought revised frontal styling and ventilated disc brakes. Introduced at the October 1971 Earl's Court Motor Show, the Interceptor III was visually distinguished by cast headlight surrounds, GKN cast alloy wheels and a comprehensively revamped interior and was produced in four Series - G, H, J and S4. By May 1972 the engines on RHD cars had been increased in capacity to a whopping 7212cc. A total of some 6,408 Interceptors were produced between 1966 and 1976. However, just 509 of those were Convertibles.
The indicated mileage of this gorgeous-looking Interceptor is just 25,000 - a plausible though unwarranted figure the vendor feels is supported by the sheer quality of the interior, engine bay and underside of the car. He informs us that the automatic gearbox and torque converter have been replaced in recent times and that he presently grades the Jensen as 'almost concours', with 'excellent' bodywork, paintwork, interior trim, and transmission, and adds that 'the V8 is the sweetest you will hear and the car is simply a pleasure to drive'. Though just 4,000 miles have been covered in the last 16 years, the Interceptor was apparently extensively used and enjoyed this summer, but must now make way for the impending arrival of an Aston Martin. Finished in lustrous Metallic Blue, and trimmed in Black leather contrasted by sheepskin inserts, this lovely combination of British engineering and American muscle would surely grace any classic car collection.